Book Cover for Texas Tech University Press

Print is not dead — at right a dustjacket designed for Texas Tech University Press. It uses the the signage of Route 66 and a vintage photo of Native Americans living in downtown Albuquerque in the 1930s. Yes, that’s a hogan.

Sowell Family Collection Brochure (TTU)

This is a gate-fold brochure for the Sowell Family Collection of natural history writers, Texas Tech University. Using varnish, metallic silver ink and a cloudscape panorama (stitched together digitally) my goal was to create a long landscape that opens to an introspective interior.

This work won an Award of Excellence from the University and College Designers Association and was displayed in Toronto in October 2007. In June of 2008, it won the American Library Association Best of Show competition in the Services Available/Orientation Materials/Policy Materials category, and was displayed in San Diego.


Beyond Print poster/catalog

Printed using soy inks on a recycled stock, this poster folds to an accordion-fold catalog. Untrimmed, color bars, crop marks etc. were left on the piece. The low waste and dual-purpose earned this a Gold award in the green production category of the 2009 University and College Design Association’s annual awards in Seattle. In 2011, it won an award of excellence from the New Mexico chapter of the AIGA and was displayed in Santa Fe.



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Annual Report

This cover to an annual report with its bookshelf became the visual metaphor for the first Yale University Web presence in 1993—94. By clicking on the spines of the books (from the 18th century seed collection to the Yale Library) the user could navigate the early site.



Poster

Inspired by the paper dresses of the late 1960s, this poster could be cut and folded to make an A-line dress.

Below: a paper dress by designer Harry Gordon, ca. 1969.



Annual Report

This cover to an annual report with its bookshelf became the visual metaphor for the first Yale University Web presence in 1993—94. By clicking on the spines of the books (from the 18th century seed collection to the Yale Library) the user could navigate the early site.



Poster

More than Muñecas (More than Dolls)
poster for lecture on Mexico as Portrayed in Paper Dolls
1920–1970.

A pre-colonial tradition of paper-making exists in Mexico. Among the Sierra Otomí, shamanistic amate paper cutting is still practiced and is perhaps the inspiration behind papel picado, or pierced tissue-paper popular during the dia de los muertos.

In this poster details from two vintage paper cut outs of the actor Cantinflas and a laser-cut facsimile of a contemporary indigenous paper figure were used to convey the wide range of dolls of or about Mexico.